BusinessAlignment

By implementing IT Service Management in your IT organisation you support the IT objectives of delivering those services that are required by the business.

 

You can’t do this without aligning your strategy with the business strategy. You can’t deliver effective IT services without knowing about the demands, needs and wishes of your customer.

 

This is why IT Service Management supports IT organisation in the business alignment of their IT activities and service delivery.

 

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Conceptsanddefinitions

Escalation:

When the time limit for resolving an incident has passed, the incident escalates into a problem and a different level of support (Problem Management) comes into force and this:

–          Edits the problem if necessary

–          Determines the impact on the service delivery and with that, the priority. The Service Desk informs clients about the progress.

 

Routing:

An incident is deposited at the second line support because no specialist knowledge for the solution is available at the Service Desk

 

Incident:

An incident is every operational event that is not part of the standard operation of an IT service. An incident influences the service delivery, although it can be small and in some cases even transparent (not noticeable) for the user.

 

Problem:

A problem is the as yet unknown cause of the occurrence of one or more incidents.

 

Known error:

This is the situation where a successful diagnosis of a problem has shown what the cause is and which CI reveals a problem. A possible solution may also be available as to how the problem can be avoided.

 

Expert or Super user:

Some organisations may use “expert” users to solve some first line support queries, depending on the structure of the organisation. This can solve some short term manning shortfalls.

 

Call

Each time the user contacts the service desk.

 

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Processes

IT service Management helps the IT organisation to manage the service delivery by organising the IT activities into end-to-end processes. These processes cross the functional areas within the IT group and improve the efficiency.

 

A process is a series of activities carried out to convert an input into an output. We can associate the input and output of each of the processes with quality characteristics and standards to provide information about the results to be obtained by the process. This produces chains of processes which show what goes into the organisation and what the result is, as well as monitoring points in the chains to monitor the quality of the products and services provided by the organisation.

 

Processes can be measured for effectiveness (did the process achieve its goal?) and efficiency (did the process use the optimum amount of resources to achieve its goal). The measurement points are at the input, the activities or the output side of the process.

 

 

The standards for the output of each process have to be defined such that the complete chain of processes meets the corporate objective, if each process complies with its process standard. If the result of a process meets the defined standard, then the process is effective. If the activities in the process are also carried out with the minimum required effort and cost, then the process is efficient. The aim of process management is to use planning and control to ensure that processes are effective and efficient.

 

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ITILServiceManagement

Any organisation that delivers IT services to their customers with a goal to support the business processes, needs some sort of structure to achieve that. Historically, that structure was based around functions and technical capabilities. Currently, with the ever-increasing speed of changes, and the need for flexibility that is no longer an option.

 

That is why IT organisations are looking for alternatives:

–          TQM processes and continuous improvement projects

–          Cobit as a control mechanism

–          CMM for control and structure in software (and system) development

–          ITIL for operational and tactical management of service delivery

Which framework, model or tool you use is heavily reliant on the company: ‘horses for causes’ is the adagio you need to keep in mind.

 

For many IT organisations, ITIL is a very good way of managing service delivery and to perform the IT activities in end-to-end processes.

 

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HelpDeskConceptsandDefinitions

Incident:

An incident is defined as “any event which is not part of the standard operation of a service and which causes, or may cause, an interruption to, or a reduction in, the quality of that service”.

 

An incident influences the service delivery, although it can be small and in some cases even transparent (not noticeable) for the user.

 

Problem:

A problem is the as yet unknown cause of the occurrence of one or more incidents.

 

Known error:

This is the situation where a successful diagnosis of a problem has shown what the cause is and which CI reveals a problem. A possible solution may also be available as to how the problem can be avoided.

 

Work around:

It is possible for Problem Management to identify “work-around” in the investigation of problems. These should be made known to Incident Management so that they can be passed to the user until the permanent fix is implemented.

 

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